Justice

I was summoned to jury duty. I’d never been to court before, so I was quite excited at the prospect. I wondered what the case would be? Something exciting?

I entered the wood-panelled court room, sat down on the green leather bench between two other pillars of the community. We stood when the judge entered, then sat as the Crown stated the charges.

It was a string of frauds at all-night garages and 24-hour shops. Change-raising, that trick with pound coins and twenty and ten quid notes – it’s a sort of back and forth with the cashier, a lot of chat and confusion until you’ve ripped him off for a tenner. Helps if they are tired, working all night.

Anyway, the guy was saying he was innocent, was working the night shift, had just bought petrol there etc etc. Same old story. After a very boring day, we were sent off to deliberate on our verdict.

This took hours. People said the evidence was circumstantial. That the CCTV pictures could have been anyone, especially as he was wearing a cap. One juror goes “It could even be him for God’s sake!” pointing at me to prove his point. Could be anyone at all.

We went with guilty in the end. I’m glad we did, even though I knew he was not guilty, because I did it.

You could clearly see it was me. But they do say justice is blind.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s